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It Is Time To Completely Rethink How Songwriters Get Paid, I think so September 19, 2016

Posted by markallanwolfe in branding, markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, music licensing, personal.
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I found this post to be pretty informative and thought some of you might benefit from it as well if you have not already heard or read about it.

This article was written by Ari Herstand I found it at a great NEWS source for Digital Music News…http://www.digitalmusicnews.com

As the battles rage on in Washington over the recent DOJ ruling for 100% licensing of compositions and the Songwriter Equity Act continues to sit in purgatory in the halls of the do-nothing Congress, it’s time we rethink how to approach songwriter royalties. Because clearly, relying on the laws to properly compensate songwriters is a losing (and timely) battle. By the time they figure it all out, many songwriters will have packed in their guitars for non-starvation careers – like working at Starbucks.

I want to make something very clear from the get go. I am not a tech basher. I am not a doom and gloom musician-blogger. It is the greatest time to be an independent musician in the history of the music business.

But this isn’t about indie musicians. This is about songwriters.

Many of my fellow DIYers are now confused. Because so many of us are both – musician/songwriters. But there are hundreds of incredibly talented songwriters who are not Artists with a capital A. In that, they aren’t touring, gigging out much, releasing music under their own name or band name, but rather, are writing songs every day with the hopes of getting them cut by Artists with a capital A.

Now, let’s look at the problems which we’ve all heard about. Even people completely outside the music industry have read Kevin Kadish’s “My Song Was Played 178 Million Times and I Was Paid $5,769” piece or Aloe Blacc’s “Streaming Services Need To Pay Songwriters Fairly” where he stated “In return for co-writing a major hit song, I’ve earned less than $4,000 domestically from the largest digital music service.” But unfortunately these stories got completely convoluted and lost in translation where publications (including Digital Music News) mistakenly reported that Kadish’s plays occurred on Spotify. (They were actually on Pandora – a radio service which calculates plays completely differently). But everyone just reads the headlines. This headline initially said “178 Million Times On Spotify.” Spotify has been the default “bad guy” whenever the royalty debate occurs.

But, as recently revealed by Mark Mulligan, Spotify is actually paying out about 82% of their revenue, in part, because of massive guaranteed payments (estimated at $1.6 million A DAY) paid directly to labels for the rights to use their catalogs on the service. Talk about a shakedown.

And with Spotify paying out so much of their total revenue, they clearly are not the problem. But they have taken most of the flack and have gotten such a bad name over the years that many are still boycotting the service on principle. Last night while I was in a writing session, my co-writer/producer (not an Artist) pulled up a YouTube video to search for a Bee Gees song to reference. I said “still haven’t jumped on the Spotify train yet huh,” to which he replied “I can’t support Spotify. They don’t pay.”

But YouTube pays WAY less. Publicly, they state that they pay out 55% of their ad revenue to “rights holders,” but really most of that goes directly to the major labels as well.

But as one indie label revealed from their royalty statements, YouTube is only paying about $.000012 (yes four fucking zeros) per stream, whereas Spotify (on their same royalty report) paid an average of $.0037 (combined paid and free users) per stream. But, again, to reiterate these were payments to the label. Songwriter royalties are paid to publishers from streaming services and they are MUCH less.

So, tell me again why you’re mad at Spotify and not YouTube?

We’ve all heard of the 9.1 cents per download/sale mechanical royalty rate owed to songwriters. Cost per stream is much lower (about 1/10 the amount paid to labels/artists). So in the above example, Spotify is paying about $.00037 per stream for mechanical royalties.

And YouTube doesn’t pay mechanical royalties altogether because it’s video and only requires synch and performance licenses. And really, YouTube is able to hide behind DMCA Safe Harbor clauses so any user can upload any song without a synch license and publishers only get paid if the video/song is caught by YouTube’s Content ID and then monetized (slap an ad on it). Far from a perfect system. But the royalty rate, rest assured, is well below the $.000012 paid to labels. Some estimate around 15% of that.

+How To Legally Release Cover Videos On YouTube

You can rage on over low royalties paid by streaming services, but why?

Spotify is paying out anywhere from 70% – 82% of its total revenue to rights owners (publishers/labels/songwriters/artists). YouTube is paying 55%. Apple is paying 70%. Pandora is paying 50%.

Do I think YouTube and Pandora should pay more? Yes, of course. But, what does that even mean? Pay more to whom? How? For what purpose?

The problem with the entire songwriter royalty debate is that most partaking in the debate haven’t a clue what they’re talking about.

A typical conversation goes like this:

“Songwriters need to get paid more!”

“Yeah! From who?”

“Spotify!”

“Yeah! Fuck Spotify. How do we get them to pay more?”

“We need better laws!”

“Ugh, our government sucks.”

“Yeah.”

Long silence.

“Oh have you heard the new Justin Timberlake track?”

“No.”

“I have it right here” (cues it up on Spotify).

“It’s a banger!”

No one ever talks about a current business model that actually pays songwriters really well: synch licensing.

For most commercials, TV shows, film, and trailer synch placements the up front license fee to use the song is split 50/50: Label/Publisher or Artist/Songwriter.

So, if the commercial pays $100,000 for the song, typically $50,000 is paid for the use of the composition and $50,000 is paid for the use of the recording.

It’s time for songwriters to demand equal pay across the board!

Why does an artist/label deserve 10x more than the songwriter/publisher? These rates are completely outdated. Sure, at one point in time, the label covered all costs of an artist’s development and put tons into marketing and only made money off of record sales.

Now that labels aren’t really developing artists anymore and are, more times than not, striking 360 deals (where they take a cut of every part of an artist’s career from touring and merchandising to sponsorships and even meet and greets), they have no justification to demand 10x more for record earnings. Especially because they’re getting huge guarantees from most streaming services!

Well, the government set the horribly low mechanical royalty rate of 9.1 cents per download and an insanely complicated formula to calculate streams.

The problem with relying on the government to set the royalty rates is that the rates are decided based on how convincing the lobbyists are (and how generous the parties are with campaign donations). Our government is a completely fucked system. Congress rarely does what they believe is right, but what they believe will earn them the most campaign money. Because Google, Pandora, etc have the most money and lobbyists, they are able to influence congress a hell of a lot more than songwriters.

So, what’s the solution?

Stop waiting for government to set the rates! Don’t look to outdated revenue splits for ‘how it should be.’ It doesn’t need to be what it is.

Just because labels are required (by law) to pay 9.1 cents per download to the songwriter (for the mechanical royalty) doesn’t mean they can’t pay more. Hell, they’ve been getting songwriters to agree to LESS for years under the slimy “controlled composition clause.”

Keep it equal across the board:

$100 is earned from downloads/streams, $50 goes to the publisher (songwriter), $50 goes to the label (artist). $100 is earned from radio royalties, $50 goes to the publisher (songwriter), $50 goes to the label (artist).

I know I know, it sounds simple and reasonable but just can’t work right? Well, it can. Here’s how:

So, the reason synch licenses are typically 50/50 is because you can’t use a song without negotiating with the label and publisher for a rate to use the song. And oftentimes they have Most Favored Nations clauses where each side will make no less than what the other side is making.

Sales / Streams:

Ok, so how does this work for sales and (interactive) streams (like from Spotify and Apple Music) when the government sets the mechanical royalty rate for songwriters? Simple, make the label make up the difference. Labels pay producers all the time based on record earnings (on top of their fee). Oftentimes from the first dollar earned (no expenses need to be recouped). So if a song earns $100,000 and the producer has 5 points, the producer earns $5,000. Oftentimes the producer makes more than the artist up front (because the artist needs to recoup all expenses and the advance). If the songwriter is currently making about 10% of the royalties from mechanicals, the songwriter should demand an additional 40% from dollar one on record earnings (50% total). Yeah, you’re laughing right now “labels will never agree to this!” Well if every songwriter bound together and refused to co-write with a label’s artist unless the label agreed to pay them 50% of the song’s earnings, shit would change. Time to start a songwriter’s union?

Yeah, the major labels are the most stubborn and will be the last to come around to this, but let’s not forget that you don’t need a major label to have a music career these days. On the contrary, in the new music business you are better off without a major label.

If all the hit songwriters starting only writing for indie artists, the power structure would dramatically change. Indie labels (and DIY artists) would be much more willing (initially) to agree to these kinds of breakdowns.

I know you’re saying that the labels (and DIY artists) are funding the promotion and creation of the song. There are recording and marketing costs that the songwriter doesn’t need to pay for so why should they make money when the label/artist isn’t? Good question. The answer is, it’s not black and white. Be reasonable. Whaaaa?

It ain’t hard.

Major labels have boat loads of money and if they’re making advances from streaming services and getting a cut of the entire artist’s career, they can’t claim they can’t afford this. They can. Songwriters should earn from dollar one (no expenses off the top).

If an indie label is covering recording costs, then sure, take those off the top before anyone earns anything. Totally reasonable.

If a DIYer is funding the record and putting money into marketing, then it’s totally reasonable to deduct those expenses before any royalty splits happen.

But, all you artists (and attorneys negotiating major label deals) out there, don’t you dare let the labels deduct songwriter royalties from your meager royalty rates. These newfound songwriter royalties should not have to be recouped by you. If the label is taking 88% of your money, they sure as hell can afford to pay your co-writers (and YOU if you’re also the writer) their fair share.

Radio Royalties:

Radio is a bit more difficult. Currently, digital radio pays about 10x more to SoundExchange (who then pay labels and artists) than the PROs (which then pay publishers and songwriters). This is what the Songwriter Equity Act is looking to fix: the ability for the PROs to negotiate higher rates. Pandora is said to pay 50% of their total revenue for royalties. Well, they should be paying more. If Apple, Tidal and Spotify are paying at least 70%, Pandora should be paying 70% or more. How to get them to do that? Well, that’s another topic for another article. But at least it’s something to work towards.

But, remember, when we’re discussing Pandora, we’re talking about radio. And terrestrial radio (AM/FM) doesn’t pay artists/labels anything for performance royalties. This needs to change also. So when Kevin Kadish talks about his Pandora plays, he’s talking about what ASCAP paid him from Pandora. He didn’t mention how much he earned from terrestrial radio. The entire system needs to change. We need to work towards 50/50 across the board.

But Then Won’t Artists Lose Out?

The thing is, artists have the platform and the fan base. They will always be able to find a way to make money. They can tour, sell merch, get sponsorships, go direct-to-fan. Songwriters don’t have this luxury. Also, artists don’t need to make less for songwriters to make more. Major labels do.

If the labels really believe they are supporting creativity, start to pay songwriters more.

It’s time to reimagine the possibilities and solutions. Any questions?

Ari Herstand is the author of How To Make It In The New Music Business and the creator of the music biz advice blog Ari’s Take. He is a Los Angeles based singer/songwriter. Follow him on Twitter: @aristake

 

 

“Slow Dance” a NEW song by Composer Mark Allan wolfe January 19, 2015

Posted by markallanwolfe in markallanwolfe.com, music licensing, personal, Uncategorized.
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This is a NEW song by Composer Mark Allan Wolfe called “SLOW DANCE” It is a electric blues, slow groove with HEAVY R&B influences as well as some others. I was trying to create something different than I always do. A song that starts out with piano and slowly then adding other guitars and instruments to slowly build the song. I wrote it with the intention of placing vocals over it at some point just have yet to find the vocalist or the lyrics. Any ideas? Let me know

https://www.mixcloud.com/widget/iframe/?feed=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mixcloud.com%2Fmarkallanwolfe%2Fslow-dance%2F&embed_uuid=e0b1936d-05f6-4d1a-8e53-87fa41c9b291&replace=0&hide_cover=1&embed_type=widget_standard&hide_tracklist=1

I also have posted a link to another website that offers a few more tracks of mine but will probably hpold more very shortly. Check it out let m eknow what you guys think. Please feel free to post it and share!

Slow dance by Mark Allan Wolfe on Mixcloud

Balancing Act a New music video September 21, 2014

Posted by markallanwolfe in markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, music licensing, music video, personal, Recording Helps, Spirituality, Uncategorized.
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Balancing Act

This is a video exploring another side of the music of Mark Allan Wolfe. Noted for Rock, Indie, and New Age music, here is a cinematic piece. The song opens with soft piano, that is haunting and is joined by guitar and cello and culminates in a balancing act of a variety of musical instruments. The swelling of cymbals, orchestral elements, and traditional island percussion. For more music and licensing information please visit markallanwolfe.com
If you are interested in licensing music immediately you can start by visiting the online music licensing store located at
http://markallanwolfe.com/License Music.html

Boxers are the best September 4, 2014

Posted by markallanwolfe in branding, markallanwolfe.com, music video, personal, silly things.
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Boxers are the best.

 

I made this video to share with you my love for BOXERS! The pictures are from all over the globe and of course a few from my dog JAKE. The music track is a song I recently composed called “FRIENDS” So I dedicated this song to my animals in my life. I hope you are blessed when watching this little video. If you would like to know more about the music of composer Mark Allan Wolfe please visit www.markallanwolfe.com Share this with your dog loving friends!!

Boxers are the best July 13, 2014

Posted by markallanwolfe in markallanwolfe.com, music video, personal, silly things, Uncategorized.
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Boxers are the best.

 

With all of the bad news going on in the world today I thought I would try to bring a little light to yours! This is a light hearted little vid I created for my Boxer! I also included a new tune I inspired by my four legged friends I have had the pleasure of knowing in my life.
Visit markallanwolfe.com for more info and music.

Jeff Beck Releases 3 new songs May 6, 2014

Posted by markallanwolfe in markallanwolfe.com, music business, music video.
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eff Beck has released a new three-track CD — Yosogai — in Japan. Don’t bother looking for it on iTunes in the U.S. — it’s not there, although some of the songs might wind up on his much-anticipated 2014 album.

Beck, who has been touring for several weeks and is scheduled to tour throughout the summer with ZZ Top, has been performing one of the songs from the new EP, “Why Give It Away,” as a treat for fans.

Below, you can check out a (somewhat annoying) fan-filmed video that kicks off with “Cause We’ve Ended As Lovers” and shifts into the funky “Why Give It Away” at the 3:46 mark.

Yosogai is rounded out by two more songs, “Loaded” and a live version of “Danny Boy,” which features Imelda May on vocals. Incidentally, the studio version of “Why Give It Away” features Sophie Delila on vocals. At the April 8 Tokyo performance shown below, bassist Rhonda Smith sings. The rest of Beck’s current band includes Jonathan Joseph on drums, Lizzie Ball on violin and Nicolas Meier on guitar.

To see all of Beck’s current tour dates, HERE

To order YOSOGAI CLICK HERE

Jeff Beck and ZZ Top Announce North American Summer Tour

 

More Mixing Tips: How to Use Reverb to Create Depth April 30, 2014

Posted by markallanwolfe in markallanwolfe.com, personal, Uncategorized.
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While reading around the web to educate myself and learning more tricks of the trade I came upon this and a few other blogs that to me showed a person how to make better mixes and how to correctly tweak a jam to sound awesome.

There are a lot of engineers and producers out and about who have great ideas and there is no excuse for anyone who is in this feild , to try to become better at it. So I felt I would share a bit of an excerpt from this great lesson over at Cakewalk BLOG   I hope it helps you or at least sparks an interest into learning more on how to make better recordings.

READ ON…….,

Mix engineers that have had their time behind a board can pick out the misuse of Reverb when they hear it. Just like with anything, applying the proper Reverb requires more time than just scrolling through the presets of the basic Hall, Room, and Plate algorithms.

Music tends to have a significant three-dimensional experience to it. This concept requires the understanding of width, height, and depth. The best way to understand this is to find a pair of large studio headphones and listen to some billboard topping hits that have dense and complex instrumentation. Grab a sheet of paper and draw two lines intersecting as well as one diagonally through the middle. Label them “Width”, “Height”, and “Depth”. Make a few copies of this sheet and as you listen to the music observe where the instruments sit in the mix. Mark the Toms, Snare, Kick, Vocals, Guitars, Keys, Backing Vocals, Bass, Strings etc. in their respective places on this XYZ plane. Once finished compare and contrast the different songs you listened to and you may notice how different each song turns out. Take one of your own mixes and do the same. You may learn something about your own techniques.

What does this little art project have to do with Reverb? Well, creating space is where the struggle begins.

In Use

The company Overloud has released a wonderful new version of their product “BREVERB SONAR”. The company asks customers to think of their ideal studio. In short they suggest that BREVERB SONAR could replace the “classic white 80′s unit” found in most major recording studios. That device is the Lexicon 480L which was and still is an iconic unit in many studios. BREVERB SONAR picks up right where that Lexicon unit left off as far as sound and use is concerned. Without realizing it I began to operate BREVERB SONAR with ease from my former understanding of how it’s predecessor worked. The whole fader-soft key interface is much friendlier than an attempt to understand how and why some other companies include a real time diagram of how reverb interacts with incoming sound. This unit is the perfect candidate for understanding how to apply reverb to enhance your mix.

General Mixing

Before applying any time based effects to a mix I typically will gather the stems in a simple levels and panning mix. This helps set some relatively even levels before applying and EQ, Compression, or Reverb.

I started the mix by raising the Kick Drum signal to an optimum decibel level. The rest of the Drumset was easy to place because of the minimal microphone usage. Afterwards, I bumped up the High Hat in the drum mix a tad because without it the song felt sluggish and choppy. After this I added the Bass signals to the track. Stylistically this song is of the Dub/Reggae/Pop genre so the Bass’ tone is quite heavy in the low end with less clarity in the high end.

After setting the rhythm section to my liking I added the Vocal track. The voice is the most important aspect of this style so getting it even with the rhythm section was my priority. Afterwards I gently brought in the acoustic guitar under the vocal and panned it to my liking. There are three signals for the Acoustic Guitar: The direct signal from the Acoustic Guitar’s pickup and a tightly placed 57 and 421 configuration directly over the sound hole. This allowed for narrow panning scheme between the three different signals without feeling too unnatural.

Bussing

Understanding how Reverb can be used to enhance the spatial tone of a mix first requires some setup within your respective DAW. I started by adding as many Buses as I felt necessary for the instruments that needed work. In this particular mix I set up five buses and labelled them: Snare Bus, Drum Bus, Vocal Bus, Guitar Bus, and Distance Effect. Each one had an instance of BREVERB SONAR loaded with all of the faders pulled downward. (By habit I never start with my faders up before I listen to them) The instrumentation of this track is somewhat simple by design so setting up these five buses was more than plenty for my purposes.

Acoustic Guitars

BREVERB SONAR’s power is reflected in the parameters it displays for the different algorithms of Hall, Plate, Room, and Inverse. Given the nature of the song I decided that using the Plate and Room algorithms were best suited for this style.

Routing
ll three Acoustic Guitar tracks were sent to the Guitar Bus and panned accordingly to match the way they sat in the mix.

SONAR adds a Stereo Bus by default. This automatically gives you the option for panning any sends that are added to the “Sends” section of your tracks in the Console View.The concept is the same in every DAW but the setup and routing may vary.

On first listen everything seemed too up close. The Drums, Bass, Vocals, and Acoustic Guitars are competing for the same space. BREVERB SONAR can be used multiple ways to alleviate this problem.

To rectify the clashing of all these instruments within this space I added some ambience to the Acoustic Guitars to set it below the Vocals. This provides a small level of separation from the Vocal track so that it sits under it and not directly in the way of it.

Using BREVERB SONAR’s Parameters

I was relying on the Size, Predelay, and Decay parameters within BREVERB SONAR to create this sensation of depth. The outcome is subtle but effective. By nature, the Room reverb is somewhat shorter than say a Hall or Cathedral reverb algorithm. According to Overloud the Size parameter at 100% emulates the sound of a large studio room. In setting the Size to 14% the “Room” that I created sounded like a smaller isolation booth. I don’t want to this instrument to be drowning in Reverb so picking the Room is the ideal setting.

I will be including examples of the Reverb parameters at their final levels and then a comparison of what that parameter would sound like if applied overzealously.

If you are interested in hearing more about this and other recorded examples why note CLICK HERE

If you follow the link over to CAKEWALK’s BLOG you will hear samples of the acoustic guitar, snar drum, whole drum kit and vocals. I found this article to be very helpful and insightful. It has pleanty of examples and a few ideas where with you can bring to your own mixing experience.

I am going to be placing MORE info on mixing and recording , social media marketing, how to license your music and all that stuff you need to start making more money and better recordings. I feel there is NO end to education but you need to focus on what you will use, in my humble opinion.

 

February 23, 2014

Posted by markallanwolfe in branding, markallanwolfe.com, music licensing, music video, personal, Spirituality, Uncategorized.
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here are a few new media uploads to my servers thought you might like the change.  For starters I thought you might lke to rock out to some pretty cool new jams of mine.

http://markallanwolfe.com/media/cosmic breakdown.mp3

http://markallanwolfe.com/media/surfing on the edge.mp3

http://markallanwolfe.com/media/backwoods stomp.mp3

“This last song starts out like some backwoods country hike but you quickly find you are not in any woods you think”

http://animoto.com/play/YuVCqWOLZIORe9Mv183PuQ#

 

This is a song made for Film, TV and anywhere else you might need it. The song is indie rock / pop rock. All music is pre cleared and ready for immediate licensing. For more info on Mark and his music, please visit markallanwolfe.com

I also wanted to share this other peice of artwork I been working on lately, I have this and a few others working on for a possible album cover of brand new material. I have the face of the WOlf staring out of the moon with a lone wolf in the forground having tounges of fire coming from throughout the wolf, as well as grey blue smoke representing the mysticism of the animal.

Into the night

This is artwork for an upcoming release of new online albumn by Mark Allan Wolfe

The Basic’s of Music Publishing March 25, 2013

Posted by markallanwolfe in branding, markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, music licensing.
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I would suggest that with anything you need to learn and study what you can. If your trying to go at making music a career or make any kind of money of your music you should always do what you can to understand the business. There is SO much to learn and many other folks out there with more info that you have no excuse for not teaching yourself.

THis article is by no means and end all but merely a starting point to educate yourself in the music business. I would also like to share with you a few places to visit at the end of this BLOG posting that you may find some helpful tools and insights along with some encouragement. Follow the links at the bottom be sure to share all things withthose in your world of influence for you never know who is listening. Peace

 

Copyright Basics

Whenever an original song, with lyrics or instrumental music, is “fixed” in a tangible medium (recorded or written down), a copyright is generated. The copyright owner of a song is entitled to certain exclusive rights in the song under the U.S. Copyright Act. Therefore, only the copyright owner of a song can use the song unless someone pays him to use it. When a copyright owner allows someone else to use his music, the owner is really granting a license in the copyright. A license is a legal agreement between two or more parties that allows one party to use something that another party owns, but does not transfer ownership from one party to the other. The money from these licenses is called publishing.

Publishing

1. Registration with Library of Congress and optionally, with the PRO (ASCAP, BMI, SESAC) with whom the publisher and/or songwriter are affiliated. Registration provides best protection in the event of copyright infringement.

The three main PROs in the United States are BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.), ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers), and SESAC (Society of European Stage Authors and Composers). Each of these works basically the same way but with a few slight differences. Each boasts thousands of members and many great artists and performers. For instance BMI has over 350,000 members including Jimmy Buffet and The Beatles. ASCAP also has over 300,000 members including Elvis Costello, Jay-Z, and Alan Jackson. SESAC has Garth Brooks and Bob Dylan in their stable.

2. Exploitation – can include sales of CDs, downloads, ring tones, video games, film, tv, advertising and many forms of different commercial licensing usages.

3. Collection – getting the money for the mechanical royalties plus any/all other licensing fees which are sold.

Summary of music publishing

Even as the music industry changes, publishing will always be the “constant” at the center, so it’s important to understand the publishing side of the music business. For example, even if CD (compac discs) sales completely fade out, there will still be mechanicals, synchronization, performance royalties and other streams of income from dozens of traditional and new commercial music licensing types.

License Music markallanwolfe.com

License Music wolfiesmusicpublishing.com

Publishing

Publishing is concerned with the registration, exploitation (Sales), and collection of the copyright.

Royalty Streams

In this video  An Introduction to Music Publishing   learn how royalty streams work.

1. Royalties paid to the songwriter/composer (could be same as publisher) are the mechanical royalty which covers the composition.
2. Royalties are also paid to the performer of the song, which can be the same as the publisher and/or record label.

Publishing is focused primarily on the royalties paid to the songwriters and composers. If you are just starting out, you will most likely be a self-published publisher, which is very common these days, and is the best way to build and expand your future music publishing career and licensing opportunities.

Songwriters receive the following royalties

1. Mechanicals for the composition of the music – paid by the label to the songwriter for the rights to “mechanically reproduce” the writer’s song on CD or download. Note, this occurs whether or not the writer is the performer of the song.

2. Performance – Paid by the Performance Rights Organizations (ASCAP, BMI, SESAC), to the writer(s) of the song when the writer’s music is broadcast over the public airwaves, such as radio, tv, satellite, internet, etc. Note, some music publishers and libraries also do direct, “per program” licensing deals with broadcasters or other businesses using their music.

3. Synchronization for use of music with visual media such as film, videos, slide shows or games, etc. – Paid by the producer of a movie, tv show or ad agency to the writer of the song for the right to “synchronize” the writer’s music to the producer’s moving images.

4. Special use – paid by creators of ring tones, karaoke, video games, etc. to the songwriter for the rights to use the songwriter’s composition work.

5. Print – When music gets published in song books, sheet music or other transcriptions, the royalties are paid to the publisher and the songwriter.

It is important for you as an artist or someone involved with artists, to understand how music publishing works to generate money, but also to generate interest and audiences to continue growing your publishing career and related opportunities.  To learn more about the most common music licenses categories and types,  I would recommend Types of Music License article.

Links for MORE

markallanwolfe.com

wolfiesmusicpublishing.com

artistshousemusic.org

licensequote.com

 

Mark Allan Wolfe BLOG is now also @ markallanwolfe.com February 19, 2013

Posted by markallanwolfe in Uncategorized.
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Wll hellp everyone I just remembered that I forgot to tell you that this BLOG is now moved over to my website at markallanwolfe.com!! You can still read up on things here when I post them but I forget from time to time to re send them from there to here.

You can still find the same helpful tools as before and the other blog will still be active but I might go a little different on this one. At any rate please make sure you make note of visiting the new BLOG over at markallanwolfe.com I have tried to make it easier for both blogs to be in one place.

Now I also wanted to share this awesome little video I found of the guitarist Steve Vai about touring with David Lee Roth, pretty cool! Have great day and remember to share the gift of music with some one.

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