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It Is Time To Completely Rethink How Songwriters Get Paid, I think so September 19, 2016

Posted by markallanwolfe in branding, markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, music licensing, personal.
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I found this post to be pretty informative and thought some of you might benefit from it as well if you have not already heard or read about it.

This article was written by Ari Herstand I found it at a great NEWS source for Digital Music News…http://www.digitalmusicnews.com

As the battles rage on in Washington over the recent DOJ ruling for 100% licensing of compositions and the Songwriter Equity Act continues to sit in purgatory in the halls of the do-nothing Congress, it’s time we rethink how to approach songwriter royalties. Because clearly, relying on the laws to properly compensate songwriters is a losing (and timely) battle. By the time they figure it all out, many songwriters will have packed in their guitars for non-starvation careers – like working at Starbucks.

I want to make something very clear from the get go. I am not a tech basher. I am not a doom and gloom musician-blogger. It is the greatest time to be an independent musician in the history of the music business.

But this isn’t about indie musicians. This is about songwriters.

Many of my fellow DIYers are now confused. Because so many of us are both – musician/songwriters. But there are hundreds of incredibly talented songwriters who are not Artists with a capital A. In that, they aren’t touring, gigging out much, releasing music under their own name or band name, but rather, are writing songs every day with the hopes of getting them cut by Artists with a capital A.

Now, let’s look at the problems which we’ve all heard about. Even people completely outside the music industry have read Kevin Kadish’s “My Song Was Played 178 Million Times and I Was Paid $5,769” piece or Aloe Blacc’s “Streaming Services Need To Pay Songwriters Fairly” where he stated “In return for co-writing a major hit song, I’ve earned less than $4,000 domestically from the largest digital music service.” But unfortunately these stories got completely convoluted and lost in translation where publications (including Digital Music News) mistakenly reported that Kadish’s plays occurred on Spotify. (They were actually on Pandora – a radio service which calculates plays completely differently). But everyone just reads the headlines. This headline initially said “178 Million Times On Spotify.” Spotify has been the default “bad guy” whenever the royalty debate occurs.

But, as recently revealed by Mark Mulligan, Spotify is actually paying out about 82% of their revenue, in part, because of massive guaranteed payments (estimated at $1.6 million A DAY) paid directly to labels for the rights to use their catalogs on the service. Talk about a shakedown.

And with Spotify paying out so much of their total revenue, they clearly are not the problem. But they have taken most of the flack and have gotten such a bad name over the years that many are still boycotting the service on principle. Last night while I was in a writing session, my co-writer/producer (not an Artist) pulled up a YouTube video to search for a Bee Gees song to reference. I said “still haven’t jumped on the Spotify train yet huh,” to which he replied “I can’t support Spotify. They don’t pay.”

But YouTube pays WAY less. Publicly, they state that they pay out 55% of their ad revenue to “rights holders,” but really most of that goes directly to the major labels as well.

But as one indie label revealed from their royalty statements, YouTube is only paying about $.000012 (yes four fucking zeros) per stream, whereas Spotify (on their same royalty report) paid an average of $.0037 (combined paid and free users) per stream. But, again, to reiterate these were payments to the label. Songwriter royalties are paid to publishers from streaming services and they are MUCH less.

So, tell me again why you’re mad at Spotify and not YouTube?

We’ve all heard of the 9.1 cents per download/sale mechanical royalty rate owed to songwriters. Cost per stream is much lower (about 1/10 the amount paid to labels/artists). So in the above example, Spotify is paying about $.00037 per stream for mechanical royalties.

And YouTube doesn’t pay mechanical royalties altogether because it’s video and only requires synch and performance licenses. And really, YouTube is able to hide behind DMCA Safe Harbor clauses so any user can upload any song without a synch license and publishers only get paid if the video/song is caught by YouTube’s Content ID and then monetized (slap an ad on it). Far from a perfect system. But the royalty rate, rest assured, is well below the $.000012 paid to labels. Some estimate around 15% of that.

+How To Legally Release Cover Videos On YouTube

You can rage on over low royalties paid by streaming services, but why?

Spotify is paying out anywhere from 70% – 82% of its total revenue to rights owners (publishers/labels/songwriters/artists). YouTube is paying 55%. Apple is paying 70%. Pandora is paying 50%.

Do I think YouTube and Pandora should pay more? Yes, of course. But, what does that even mean? Pay more to whom? How? For what purpose?

The problem with the entire songwriter royalty debate is that most partaking in the debate haven’t a clue what they’re talking about.

A typical conversation goes like this:

“Songwriters need to get paid more!”

“Yeah! From who?”

“Spotify!”

“Yeah! Fuck Spotify. How do we get them to pay more?”

“We need better laws!”

“Ugh, our government sucks.”

“Yeah.”

Long silence.

“Oh have you heard the new Justin Timberlake track?”

“No.”

“I have it right here” (cues it up on Spotify).

“It’s a banger!”

No one ever talks about a current business model that actually pays songwriters really well: synch licensing.

For most commercials, TV shows, film, and trailer synch placements the up front license fee to use the song is split 50/50: Label/Publisher or Artist/Songwriter.

So, if the commercial pays $100,000 for the song, typically $50,000 is paid for the use of the composition and $50,000 is paid for the use of the recording.

It’s time for songwriters to demand equal pay across the board!

Why does an artist/label deserve 10x more than the songwriter/publisher? These rates are completely outdated. Sure, at one point in time, the label covered all costs of an artist’s development and put tons into marketing and only made money off of record sales.

Now that labels aren’t really developing artists anymore and are, more times than not, striking 360 deals (where they take a cut of every part of an artist’s career from touring and merchandising to sponsorships and even meet and greets), they have no justification to demand 10x more for record earnings. Especially because they’re getting huge guarantees from most streaming services!

Well, the government set the horribly low mechanical royalty rate of 9.1 cents per download and an insanely complicated formula to calculate streams.

The problem with relying on the government to set the royalty rates is that the rates are decided based on how convincing the lobbyists are (and how generous the parties are with campaign donations). Our government is a completely fucked system. Congress rarely does what they believe is right, but what they believe will earn them the most campaign money. Because Google, Pandora, etc have the most money and lobbyists, they are able to influence congress a hell of a lot more than songwriters.

So, what’s the solution?

Stop waiting for government to set the rates! Don’t look to outdated revenue splits for ‘how it should be.’ It doesn’t need to be what it is.

Just because labels are required (by law) to pay 9.1 cents per download to the songwriter (for the mechanical royalty) doesn’t mean they can’t pay more. Hell, they’ve been getting songwriters to agree to LESS for years under the slimy “controlled composition clause.”

Keep it equal across the board:

$100 is earned from downloads/streams, $50 goes to the publisher (songwriter), $50 goes to the label (artist). $100 is earned from radio royalties, $50 goes to the publisher (songwriter), $50 goes to the label (artist).

I know I know, it sounds simple and reasonable but just can’t work right? Well, it can. Here’s how:

So, the reason synch licenses are typically 50/50 is because you can’t use a song without negotiating with the label and publisher for a rate to use the song. And oftentimes they have Most Favored Nations clauses where each side will make no less than what the other side is making.

Sales / Streams:

Ok, so how does this work for sales and (interactive) streams (like from Spotify and Apple Music) when the government sets the mechanical royalty rate for songwriters? Simple, make the label make up the difference. Labels pay producers all the time based on record earnings (on top of their fee). Oftentimes from the first dollar earned (no expenses need to be recouped). So if a song earns $100,000 and the producer has 5 points, the producer earns $5,000. Oftentimes the producer makes more than the artist up front (because the artist needs to recoup all expenses and the advance). If the songwriter is currently making about 10% of the royalties from mechanicals, the songwriter should demand an additional 40% from dollar one on record earnings (50% total). Yeah, you’re laughing right now “labels will never agree to this!” Well if every songwriter bound together and refused to co-write with a label’s artist unless the label agreed to pay them 50% of the song’s earnings, shit would change. Time to start a songwriter’s union?

Yeah, the major labels are the most stubborn and will be the last to come around to this, but let’s not forget that you don’t need a major label to have a music career these days. On the contrary, in the new music business you are better off without a major label.

If all the hit songwriters starting only writing for indie artists, the power structure would dramatically change. Indie labels (and DIY artists) would be much more willing (initially) to agree to these kinds of breakdowns.

I know you’re saying that the labels (and DIY artists) are funding the promotion and creation of the song. There are recording and marketing costs that the songwriter doesn’t need to pay for so why should they make money when the label/artist isn’t? Good question. The answer is, it’s not black and white. Be reasonable. Whaaaa?

It ain’t hard.

Major labels have boat loads of money and if they’re making advances from streaming services and getting a cut of the entire artist’s career, they can’t claim they can’t afford this. They can. Songwriters should earn from dollar one (no expenses off the top).

If an indie label is covering recording costs, then sure, take those off the top before anyone earns anything. Totally reasonable.

If a DIYer is funding the record and putting money into marketing, then it’s totally reasonable to deduct those expenses before any royalty splits happen.

But, all you artists (and attorneys negotiating major label deals) out there, don’t you dare let the labels deduct songwriter royalties from your meager royalty rates. These newfound songwriter royalties should not have to be recouped by you. If the label is taking 88% of your money, they sure as hell can afford to pay your co-writers (and YOU if you’re also the writer) their fair share.

Radio Royalties:

Radio is a bit more difficult. Currently, digital radio pays about 10x more to SoundExchange (who then pay labels and artists) than the PROs (which then pay publishers and songwriters). This is what the Songwriter Equity Act is looking to fix: the ability for the PROs to negotiate higher rates. Pandora is said to pay 50% of their total revenue for royalties. Well, they should be paying more. If Apple, Tidal and Spotify are paying at least 70%, Pandora should be paying 70% or more. How to get them to do that? Well, that’s another topic for another article. But at least it’s something to work towards.

But, remember, when we’re discussing Pandora, we’re talking about radio. And terrestrial radio (AM/FM) doesn’t pay artists/labels anything for performance royalties. This needs to change also. So when Kevin Kadish talks about his Pandora plays, he’s talking about what ASCAP paid him from Pandora. He didn’t mention how much he earned from terrestrial radio. The entire system needs to change. We need to work towards 50/50 across the board.

But Then Won’t Artists Lose Out?

The thing is, artists have the platform and the fan base. They will always be able to find a way to make money. They can tour, sell merch, get sponsorships, go direct-to-fan. Songwriters don’t have this luxury. Also, artists don’t need to make less for songwriters to make more. Major labels do.

If the labels really believe they are supporting creativity, start to pay songwriters more.

It’s time to reimagine the possibilities and solutions. Any questions?

Ari Herstand is the author of How To Make It In The New Music Business and the creator of the music biz advice blog Ari’s Take. He is a Los Angeles based singer/songwriter. Follow him on Twitter: @aristake

 

 

Balancing Act a New music video September 21, 2014

Posted by markallanwolfe in markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, music licensing, music video, personal, Recording Helps, Spirituality, Uncategorized.
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Balancing Act

This is a video exploring another side of the music of Mark Allan Wolfe. Noted for Rock, Indie, and New Age music, here is a cinematic piece. The song opens with soft piano, that is haunting and is joined by guitar and cello and culminates in a balancing act of a variety of musical instruments. The swelling of cymbals, orchestral elements, and traditional island percussion. For more music and licensing information please visit markallanwolfe.com
If you are interested in licensing music immediately you can start by visiting the online music licensing store located at
http://markallanwolfe.com/License Music.html

Copyright what is it and who needs it? November 17, 2013

Posted by markallanwolfe in markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, music licensing.
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You need to copyright your music if you are trying to do anything with your music. If you are trying to get music placed with in Film and TV, played on the radio, or performed by some of the biggest or smallest stars in the music industry. By having a copyright for your music or written works it will protect you and your works from those who will want it for free so they can profit off of your work.

 

 

I can tell you that when I first started I did not know much about it and did not even really think it mattered. Then as I started to understand things I had someone tell me I can make a poor man’s copyright. This is a myth in the music industry that the old-fashioned fix of recording a song, placing it in an envelope and mailing it to yourself then guaranteed copyright protection. The post date on the stamp was supposed to serve as proof of the date of origin of the song, provided the envelope remained sealed.

 

However, this method didn’t stand up in various court cases and has since been discredited. Some folks will tell you it works but who is to say that an envelope’s seal cannot be carefully unsealed and resealed. So if you r going to take the time to do that why not do it right? Do you not consider your work valuable? You think it is priceless yet you will not spend $35- $40  to register it with the US Copyright office or office in your country that handles it?

 

WHAT is a COPYRIGHT?

 

Under international law, copyright is the automatic right of the creator of a work. This means that as soon as you write down a song or make a recording, it’s copyrighted. In order to enforce the copyright, though, you’ll need to be able to prove your ownership. In the US, that means you need to register your song with the U.S. government’s copyright website. This will make it much easier to assert your rights if your copyright is infringed. Read on to learn more about how to protect your song with a copyright.

 

A cool tip I found!!

As a songwriter, composer, artist writer, author it is important to keep track of every song or work you have written, when you wrote it, and who you wrote it with, whether or not you register it with the copyright office. A useful and free tool we recommend is a website such as “MyWerx” www.mywerx.com.  There, you can create a free account and log every song you create to help protect your intellectual property rights!

 

 

If you want to copyright online (the recommended method):

Visit copyright.gov

At the top of the page, it says there are several link options. I recommend you choose “eCO Tutorial.” and “HOW TO REGISTER a WORK.” This will bring up a pages that walk you through the steps of copyrighting your materials online, which includes creating an account on the website and logging in. The account itself is entirely free of charge, but remember that there are filing fees.

Copyright Office forms and information circulars are available from:
Register of Copyrights
Copyright Office
Library of Congress
Washington, D.C 20559-6000
(202) 707-6787

Fees for
Copyright
Registration:
Basic: $45
Online: $35
www.loc.gov/copyright

Whether you want to copyright online or by mail, go to http://www.copyright.gov/eco. Eco stands for electronic copyright.

If you want to copyright by mail:

At the bottom of the page, it says “Alternate Methods” and gives you a list of alternate ways to copyright your materials and the steps necessary to complete those.

It is very important that you begin the process as fast as you can. If you are wanting to make money off your work or protect it YOU are the one who needs to do it. No one cares more about your work than YOU. Always remember that.

A little reminder July 19, 2013

Posted by markallanwolfe in branding, markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, music licensing, personal, silly things, Uncategorized.
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I would like to remind everyone out there that if your looking for ways to get your music into FIlm, TV and the Wev or trying to educate yourself , perhaps your just wanting to network and connect with like minded people? Then I would encourage you to visit both these blogs and websites that have been created to help everyone out.

There is a lot of info over at markallanwolfe.com and wolfiesmusicpublishing.com including their respective blogs. So while your doing your thing be sure to bookmark and revisit these sites and catch up on some new music, or writings and do not forget to reach out with an email or two with your questions, thoughts and encouragement.

For starters if you need some pointers or sharpen your music terms then visit,
http://markallanwolfe.com/Music%20Licensing%20Terms.html

perhaps your looking for some one to give you a hand with all the things that come with trying to DIY in this crazy world of music, then check out ,
http://markallanwolfe.com/music%20consulting.html I will be soon adding a new portion here that maybe an encouragement to you as an artist or producer.

I cannot forget to include
http://markallanwolfe.com/music.html &
http://markallanwolfe.com/More%20Music.html

 

(more…)

More tips on getting music placed July 17, 2013

Posted by markallanwolfe in branding, markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, music licensing, music video, Spirituality.
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I have been enjoying the feedback and questions from the previous posts I thought I would elaborate a little more and share a few more thoughts with you. Now before I begin I must say that you may not think what I share is perhaps a tip, but these have been things that have and still do help me out. These thoughts and ideas have come from experience and from certain folks I know in the business who are either A&R people, other Music Supervisors, Composers and if I may GATE KEEPERS Muahahaha!

Now some of this MAY hurt your heart and get you angry, but if you are sick you go to the DR to find out whats wrong. If you are trying to get music placed or make some money in the music biz you are reading this humble attempt at a BLOG. I do NOT have all the answers NO ONE does but here we go…

Ok so you have made some music, you are trying to be FAMOUS, you are trying to share with the world your most incredible song that has ever graced the ears of man….now what do you do? How do you go about trying to get it to the right people? Some of you who read this may have years of experience and this will all seem silly or maybe a review of sorts.

To some this will be strange and you have never heard of these things or even contemplated them. Some of the terminology may seem foreign and strange but if you take the time to learn and read up on  these things they will benefit you in years to come.

How do you explain something that has taken a life time to learn and put into practice with in a few senteces? How does one reveal the truth to someone when they do not want to hear it? Wait a minute what? Yes thats right many people do NOT want to hear what I am saying. You want OTHER people to do all the work for you but you want to reap the rewards of THEIR labor? Yes Mr Anderson this is true. I have seen it time and time again. On one hand there are a group of people who will bust their butts and do what ever they can to try to make it in the busness and then there are those who will go half way and expect the same results. Does not happen.

You have to do your homework no matter what you have to study, force yourself to do things you would not neccessriy do as a musucian such as read, educate yourself. I cannot begin to tell you how many people will email me or call and they have NO clue as to how things work and how this business end works, they think that you make the music place it on itunes, or make a youtube video and people will stop in there tracks. Not that there is anything wrong with not knowing for we are all learning. It is the fact that this is all they think needs to be done. That some one beyond the great expanse will hear them and sign them and their music as in the days of old, or the movies.

Ask yourself a few of these questions, and write them down on paper or on your laptop….

Where do you want to be in a year?

Where do you want to be in 5 yrs?

How do you get there?

Who can help you get there?

Why do you want it?

These are your goals, your blue print for what your trying to do.

Where is music used? EVERYWHERE

Who provides them with that music? How can I get my music to them, or that person?

Why do you write your thoughts and ideas down? If you do not have some form of direction YOU WILL NEVER go anywhere. You have to set out a course a plan. You have to put yourself in the right places at the right times. I believe it was Walt Disney who said  “The way to get started is to quit talking and start doing.”

You need to identify and try to start meeting filmmakers and music supervisors. A few things to try to remember when meeting and establishing ANY new relationships with in this business are as follows;

Composing is primarily a relationship-driven business. If you are not one who likes to work with people you may have trouble working in this field. Not impossible just something to work on. Be seen as a solution NOT a problem.
Be someone who’s easy to do business with and approachable. Do not be arrogant be a little humble. Like with in ANY relationship building, remember to consider others time and thoughts not just YOURS.

Respect their time – when you call, get to the point and always listen. Don’t take anything personally. If someone gives you their thoughts or ideas (like this BLOG) do not trip out just realize that it is just their views. RESPECT, relax, do not stop making music because you got rejected EVERYONE gets rejected.Edison the dude who helped discover the light bulb failed like hundreds of times I think even 206 times!
Always inspire confidence in you and your music. Always remember the unique aspects about you and your music.
Do your homework – learn as much as possible about the person & projects.

I will always share when I can to try to help out everyone. I would humbly ask that if you like this posting and have benefited from it that you write us back share your music with us if you want. I am always looking to network with people of like mind and collaborate so feel free to email. I would also like to ask that you share this with anyone you feel would benefit. It is like we are trying to put into practice what I have been writing about these past few articles. Lets build relationships. ROCK ON!

 

More tips on getting music placed.

The Basic’s of Music Publishing March 25, 2013

Posted by markallanwolfe in branding, markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, music licensing.
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I would suggest that with anything you need to learn and study what you can. If your trying to go at making music a career or make any kind of money of your music you should always do what you can to understand the business. There is SO much to learn and many other folks out there with more info that you have no excuse for not teaching yourself.

THis article is by no means and end all but merely a starting point to educate yourself in the music business. I would also like to share with you a few places to visit at the end of this BLOG posting that you may find some helpful tools and insights along with some encouragement. Follow the links at the bottom be sure to share all things withthose in your world of influence for you never know who is listening. Peace

 

Copyright Basics

Whenever an original song, with lyrics or instrumental music, is “fixed” in a tangible medium (recorded or written down), a copyright is generated. The copyright owner of a song is entitled to certain exclusive rights in the song under the U.S. Copyright Act. Therefore, only the copyright owner of a song can use the song unless someone pays him to use it. When a copyright owner allows someone else to use his music, the owner is really granting a license in the copyright. A license is a legal agreement between two or more parties that allows one party to use something that another party owns, but does not transfer ownership from one party to the other. The money from these licenses is called publishing.

Publishing

1. Registration with Library of Congress and optionally, with the PRO (ASCAP, BMI, SESAC) with whom the publisher and/or songwriter are affiliated. Registration provides best protection in the event of copyright infringement.

The three main PROs in the United States are BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.), ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers), and SESAC (Society of European Stage Authors and Composers). Each of these works basically the same way but with a few slight differences. Each boasts thousands of members and many great artists and performers. For instance BMI has over 350,000 members including Jimmy Buffet and The Beatles. ASCAP also has over 300,000 members including Elvis Costello, Jay-Z, and Alan Jackson. SESAC has Garth Brooks and Bob Dylan in their stable.

2. Exploitation – can include sales of CDs, downloads, ring tones, video games, film, tv, advertising and many forms of different commercial licensing usages.

3. Collection – getting the money for the mechanical royalties plus any/all other licensing fees which are sold.

Summary of music publishing

Even as the music industry changes, publishing will always be the “constant” at the center, so it’s important to understand the publishing side of the music business. For example, even if CD (compac discs) sales completely fade out, there will still be mechanicals, synchronization, performance royalties and other streams of income from dozens of traditional and new commercial music licensing types.

License Music markallanwolfe.com

License Music wolfiesmusicpublishing.com

Publishing

Publishing is concerned with the registration, exploitation (Sales), and collection of the copyright.

Royalty Streams

In this video  An Introduction to Music Publishing   learn how royalty streams work.

1. Royalties paid to the songwriter/composer (could be same as publisher) are the mechanical royalty which covers the composition.
2. Royalties are also paid to the performer of the song, which can be the same as the publisher and/or record label.

Publishing is focused primarily on the royalties paid to the songwriters and composers. If you are just starting out, you will most likely be a self-published publisher, which is very common these days, and is the best way to build and expand your future music publishing career and licensing opportunities.

Songwriters receive the following royalties

1. Mechanicals for the composition of the music – paid by the label to the songwriter for the rights to “mechanically reproduce” the writer’s song on CD or download. Note, this occurs whether or not the writer is the performer of the song.

2. Performance – Paid by the Performance Rights Organizations (ASCAP, BMI, SESAC), to the writer(s) of the song when the writer’s music is broadcast over the public airwaves, such as radio, tv, satellite, internet, etc. Note, some music publishers and libraries also do direct, “per program” licensing deals with broadcasters or other businesses using their music.

3. Synchronization for use of music with visual media such as film, videos, slide shows or games, etc. – Paid by the producer of a movie, tv show or ad agency to the writer of the song for the right to “synchronize” the writer’s music to the producer’s moving images.

4. Special use – paid by creators of ring tones, karaoke, video games, etc. to the songwriter for the rights to use the songwriter’s composition work.

5. Print – When music gets published in song books, sheet music or other transcriptions, the royalties are paid to the publisher and the songwriter.

It is important for you as an artist or someone involved with artists, to understand how music publishing works to generate money, but also to generate interest and audiences to continue growing your publishing career and related opportunities.  To learn more about the most common music licenses categories and types,  I would recommend Types of Music License article.

Links for MORE

markallanwolfe.com

wolfiesmusicpublishing.com

artistshousemusic.org

licensequote.com

 

Make Your Music Career a Reality October 24, 2012

Posted by markallanwolfe in markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, personal, Spirituality.
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markallanwolfe.com

markallanwolfe.com

 

There are many ways to help advance your career if you want to. Many people are waiting for OTHERS to do it for them but the truth is NO ONE CARES more about YOUR music than YOU! I cannot begin to tell you about how many artist and bands approach me wanting to be FAMOUS or what ever but are doing absolutely NOTHING about trying to achieve their goals.

I wanted to maybe share a few ideas that may help you in your endeavors.

SET GOALS

 

To earn a good living in the music industry, you MUST develop a specific plan for how you will reach your goals. If you merely fantasize about making a lot of money, this is not enough to make this goal a reality. Rather than fantasizing, start working toward what you want to achieve by asking yourself the following questions:

  1. What are you doing to build your music career?
  2. What are you wanting out of your musical career ?
  3. Who are you surrounding yourself with ?
  4. Where do you see yourself in 5 yrs? of 2 yrs? even in 6 months?
  5. How are your going to get to where you want to be?

After you have figured out your answers for each question above, you must focus on making every action you take in your music career go toward achieving the exact goals you have made for yourself.

Most musicians looking to become successful in the music business are not sure what they must do to reach their desired goals. If you are experiencing this as well, the best solution to this problem is to seek out training from a professional who has shown other musicians how to earn a lot of money in their careers. This way, you can avoid making mistakes that will cost you significant time and effort to fix.

If you are looking for information on how to start your journey, or looking for help to build upon that which you have already started, then I would ask you to please send me an email  with some info about yourself and maybe I can help.

I will write more in the days to come in the mean time take some time to think about and answer the questions about. The answer may surprise you. A lot of people just say, ” I am going to be a big star, make all kinds of money” but they do not know how to accomplish this, or who to have help them. I may not have all your answers but I feel I can help you in your journey.

 

Mark Allan Wolfe

www.markallanwolfe.com

markallanwolfe.com

MarkAllanWolfe.com

UK FILM COMPANY IN BREACH OF CONTRACT August 20, 2012

Posted by markallanwolfe in markallanwolfe.com, music business, Music Law & Copyright, personal, Uncategorized.
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WAP PUBLISHING TERMINATES MOFILM COMMERCIAL AGREEMENT

                  UK FILM COMPANY IN BREACH OF CONTRACT

OVER 200 POPULAR ONLINE AND BROADCAST COMMERCIALS AFFECTED INCLUDING: PEPSI, COCA COLA, CHEVROLET, BUD LIGHT,  

              CADILLAC, BEST BUY, AT&T, KODAK, MICROSOFT

 

WAP Publishing has terminated their agreement with the UK-based MoFilm as of March 2012, due to non-payment of the license fees. WAP worked with MoFilm and provided them with music for over 200 online and broadcast commercials. All of these commercials continue to exist via broadcast and digital media and are viewed globally. Almost all of these commercials are now unlicensed and their music synchronization licenses have expired or they have been revoked for non-payment.

WAP Publishing represents many individual composers like, Atlanta-based Mark Allan Wolfe. The problem grew wider when companies like: AT&T, Chevrolet, Coca Cola, Pepsi, Unilever refused to respond to any WAP correspondence notifying them of MoFilm’s lawful termination.

We have contacted many of the 39 (primarily) US-based companies informing them months ago, how MoFilm has been terminated. We thought this proposed transference would be a simple matter. We assumed each company would handle it in an appropriate manner and respect the copyright of others, in the same way they so proudly and fiercely defend their own copyrights.

We explained how MoFilm was not paying WAP. In fact, as the licensor, all potential licenses should be contacting WAP directly. If all the brands would please contact us, WAP Publishing will gladly restructure an agreement on behalf of our songwriters/musicians”, Guy Ratcliffe/CEO WAP Publishing said.

Composer Mark Allan Wolfe said, “At first, I gave them the benefit of doubt until it amounted to be too much. If it weren’t for Guy Ratcliffe stepping in, I doubt I would have been paid anything. As payments diminished, became less frequent to then, none at all, it seemed clear, they were violating our agreement blatantly. Guy and I contacted our legal counsel Bienstock & Michael – Hackensack, NJ about the problem with MoFilm”.  www.markallanwolfe.com

 

WAP worked with MoFilm for over two years, dating back to 2010.WAP has tried every known way to rectify this. It is with great regret that WAP has to make this an international public issue. WAP does not want to embarrass the 39 brands involved, but the indifference and non-responsive stance – encountered to date – has forced WAP to go public. For further details and to view some of the commercial videos referred to, please see our blog at www.wappublishing.com.

Here is the full list of the brands affected, totaling over 200 instances of internet and TV broadcast commercials:

ADOBE                                                             MAX

AMERICAN RED CROSS                              MICROSOFT

AT&T                                                               MOUNTAIN DEW

BEST BUY                                                       NATARAJ PENCILS

BUD LIGHT                                                     NATURE VALLEY

CADILLAC                                                      NOKIA

CHEVROLET                                                   NOVARTIS

CHEX MIX                                                       PEPSI

COCA COLA                                                    RENAISSANCE

COKE LIGHT                                                   SATPUDA FOUNDATION

COKE ZERO                                                     SEVEN BAR

FINDUS                                                             SOVEREIGHN BANK

HIDUSTAN TIMES                                          SURF EXCEL

KASBERSKY                                                   TEEB

KASPERSKY                                                    TROPICANA

KODAK                                                             UNILEVER

LAMISIL                                                           VASELINE

LEGO                                                                 VITAMIN WATER

LOGITECH                                                        VOLTAREN

Visit Wap Publishing BLOG and watch several of the said TV commercials, web adverts, film competition submissions and more. It is of course not a FULL listing though but a big one at that.

http://www.wappublishing.com/index.php/blog

As many of you who know me, I am a very mellow easy going person who loves people and hate confrontation but not afraid to go forwards when needed. After a long time of thought and trying to resolve something a certain way I feel the need to publish certain things we have been dealing with in hopes to fix things that are broken. I share this information with the hopes of building a bridge of communication and restoring relationships as well as getting paid for services rendered.

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